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Rincon celebrates with Air Station color guard

By Lance Cpl. Brendan Roethel | | July 3, 2013

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The residents of the sleepy little city of Rincon, Ga. came out as patriotic music and the colors red, white and blue filled the roads.

A loud roar of excitement came as the parade drew near, which being led through the streets by the Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort Color Guard. Children cheered, adults thanked them and retirees shouted “OOH-RAH,” as the Ma­rines marched in their dress blues, carrying the colors down long Georgia streets.

The city of Rincon held its an­nual 4th of July Parade in cel­ebration of the sacrifices made by the men and women of the armed forces and the hard work and dedication of America’s fore­fathers, June 29. During the cel­ebration the city’s streets were lined with hundreds of residents in support of the active and re­tired service members of not only the city but the country as well. The parade also included businesses, organizations and churches native to the area.

“This event highlights the stuff America is built upon,” said Aidan Mallory, a native of Rincon, Ga. “From local small businesses to the military per­sonnel, whether they’re active or retired, all represent what America is all about. This parade is a patriotic celebration in ev­ery sense of the word.”

The parade is one of the pre­mier events for the growing city, and is celebrated by members of the community from all walks of life.

“Being a part of the color guard and marching in front of those I am sworn to protect is especially important to me,” said Lance Cpl. Alexander Brey, a food service specialist for the Mess Hall aboard MCAS Beau­fort and a right rifleman with the color guard. “Hearing them cheer as we walk by reminds me of the sacrifices made by my fel­low Marines and service mem­bers. It reminds me that they support us and stand alongside us through whatever our coun­try calls us to do.”

Many residents of Rincon Ga. help prepare for the parade months in advance. From deco­rating floats to designing signs and painting cars, the commu­nity goes out of their way to make the parade bigger and better every year.

“When I moved to Rincon 16 years ago, I heard all the noise and came down to watch,” said Mallory. “It’s a tradition for me, and next year I plan on making signs in support of the troops to give a little of what I have to the men and women that have done so much for count­less Americans and myself. It is a nice way to remind people of the sacrifices the troops make that allow even the simplest of celebrations like this to exist.”


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