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Workplace violence can be stopped with new program

By Sgt. Terika King | | September 5, 2013

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On Aug. 28, Army Maj. Nidal Hasan was sentenced to death for killing 13 people and injuring 32 during a rampage shooting in Fort Hood Texas. The incident, as well as the court martial proceedings, have put focus on workplace safety in the military environment. 

The Department of the Navy introduced a new program led by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service meant to “prevent workplace violence and emphasize bystander action and intervention,” according to All Navy Message 054/13. 

The Crime Reduction Program was implemented Aug. 1 and will continue through Sept. 30. The campaign’s theme is “Workplace Violence Does Not Happen Without Warning.”
The initiative emphasizes the importance of bystander action and intervention in order to prevent workplace violence.  

ALNAV 054/13 states, “Pre-indicators of workplace violence are varied and take many forms, including direct or indirect threats, physical assault, stalking or sudden marked changes in behavior.” 

Taking notice of those types of situations in the workplace and interceding may prevent coworkers from engaging in the types of behaviors punishable under the Uniformed Code of Military Justice and the laws of the Federal and state governments.

As with the Fort Hood incident, Hasan began to act strangely in the days leading up to the shooting. According to his neighbors, he began to have guests visit his home when he’d never had people over before. He began to give away his belongings and donate many practical things to charity even though he told others he was only going on a deployment to Afghanistan.

The new initiative informs workers that noticing small incidents and irregularities could help prevent workplace tragedies. 

In the event a situation arises where one feels unsafe to intervene, individuals can report the incident to NCIS anonymously through a text and tip line. Text to 274637 (CRIMES) and add “NCIS” at the beginning of the message. For more information, visit www.ncis.navy.mil.
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