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Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort

"The Noise You Hear, is the Sound of FREEDOM."
Bolden students breathe life into history

By Lance Cpl. Terry Haynes III | Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort | January 22, 2018

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    Students from Charles F. Bolden Elementary and Middle School participated in the school’s 15th annual Live Wax Museum exhibit on Laurel Bay Jan. 17. 

    The Live Wax Museum is an event where students dress up as influential people from the past and present information on that person’s life and accomplishments.     The event was organized by the teachers of the gifted education, creative thinking and advancement via individual determination classes.

    “This project is a fun way to get familiar with others and prepare to deal with failure,” said Travis Summers, a fifth grade student. “I used to be very shy and afraid t     o present in front of other people, but after I did this for the first time last year, I noticed I became a better student in general.”

    The entire school starting from the library to the wings of the hallways was lined by booths of students in attire, from their time covered time period, as different     significant people in from politicians like Harry S. Truman and John F. Kennedy to famous athletes like Michael Jordan and Hank Aaron. 

    “It’s amazing the creativity and imagination these students showcase every year,” said Kathy S. Holley, the gifted education and creative thinking teacher. “It’s a     fun way to bring the students outside of their comfort zones and to make them more organized and confident presenters.”

    The three month graded assignment consists of a three to four page report, a presentation board, eight to 10 items that relate to their subject and a memorized     monologue they present to those who pass by.

    “Every year students initially feel that they can’t participate in the event because they are nervous,” said Erica Belle, the advancement via individual determination     teacher.” After they practice reciting their monologues a few times, their fears begin to go away and some even start considering who they want to be next year.”

    The Wax Museum was broken up into two separate halves. The first half was held during the school day so the rest of the school could participate, while the     second half was held in the evening for the parents of the participants in the Wax Museum. 

     “Everyone walks away with something when they leave this event,” said Holley. “The spectators leave after learning a lot of new things about people they may     have known little to nothing about, and the students leave with a better understanding of not only the person they studied and acted as but themselves as well.”


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