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Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort

"The Noise You Hear, is the Sound of FREEDOM."
Marines enhance CBRN readiness

By Cpl. John Wilkes | | March 21, 2013

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Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear defense and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines completed a joint training exercise March 8, increasing their ability to operate in contaminated and dangerous environments.

"The exercise is designed to teach Marines how to react to different chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and ordnance attacks and identify what level of mission-oriented protective posture gear is necessary," said Staff Sgt. Beth Ker-haney, an instructor for the exercise and CBRN staff noncommissioned officer in charge.

Some of the procedures for a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and ordnance attacks include detection, sampling, identification and neutralization of hazardous materials and chemicals, extraction of contaminated personnel, technical and mass decontamination, and sensitive site exploitation.

The training scenario lasted approximately 10 hours and consisted of practical application training of donning gas masks and MOPP gear and reacting to mock chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and ordnance attacks.

There were three different threats involved with this exercise, said Staff Sgt. Joshua McLeod, EOD training SNCOIC. Marines had to find and neutralize a biological agent, chemical agent, and an explosive threat.

Each type of attack requires a different approach and response.

Throughout the training, Marines of all ranks were evaluated on tactics, procedures and the basic principles each Marine learned at their in military occupational specialty school.

"This is the first time we have done a joint training exercise with both CBRN and EOD," said Ker-haney. "It is very important to train together because in a real world situation we may have to work together."

"In a real world scenario such as this there would be many different entities involved," said McLeod. "Knowing how your counterparts operate and training with them is an excellent way to be prepared for anything."


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