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Marines learn motorcycle skills

By Pfc. Justin M. Boling | | March 12, 2010

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The safety office held its fifth Advanced Riders Track Day at runway 14 Aboard the Air Station Saturday.

The track day, based on a program developed as part of the Advanced Motorcycle Operator School, was open to all Tri-Command personnel. It covered techniques such as throttle control, entry speed combined with coordinating throttle and lean at real world speeds.

“The ARTD provides a higher level of training and practice for motorcyclists,” said Gunnery Sgt. Sean McCullough, a motorcycle safety coach for Tri-Com The safety office held its fifth Advanced Riders Track Day at runway 14 Aboard the Air Station Saturday.

The track day, based on a program developed as part of the Advanced Motorcycle Operator School, was open to all Tri-Command personnel. It covered techniques such as throttle control, entry speed combined with coordinating throttle and lean at real world speeds.

“The ARTD provides a higher level of training and practice for motorcyclists,” said Gunnery Sgt. Sean McCullough, a motorcycle safety coach for Tri-Command.

The training used is based on the AMOS developed by the California Super Bike School for the Marine Corps and Navy.  Named AMOS after the general who implemented the program for motorcycle-riding Marines in March 2009. 

Training templates used at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry point, where Adam Gray, a Tactical Safety Specialist, with the Fightertown Safety office, and several Tri-Command motorcycle safety coaches attended, inspired the track day stated Gray.

Templates are used to set up the course so that people can practice the basic concepts such as cornering and steering, taught in the Beginner’s Riding Course at speeds ranging between 30-60 mph instead of 10 -15 mph, said Grey.

“The day helps them develop their skill sets, making them a safer rider,” McCullough said.

Track day training will soon be uniform throughout the Marine Corps, Gray added, mostly because riders must take some formal course to be Department of Defense certified to ride their motorcycles every three years. The exercise on the Air Station had to be certified by the command as safe.

“The day allows riders to work on their skills in a safe and controlled environment,” said Gray. “We operate on a runway that is hardly used and has lots of room.”

Despite the low numbers for the track day coaches are optimistic about the upcoming summer.

For more info on upcoming track days contact a squadron motorcycle mentor president.


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